Real-time Resilience Measurement

In 2014, TANGO launched the first of two Recurrent Monitoring Surveys (RMSs) with the USAID funded Pastoralist Areas Resilience Improvement and Market Expansion (PRIME) project in Ethiopia. The RMS collects real-time data during or shortly after a shock to understand how that shock affects households’ well-being and their responses or coping strategies, and what can help them recover.

This webinar featured key findings from the second round of the RMS for PRIME, which was triggered by the El Niño-induced drought of 2015 and 2016. The discussion also touched on other recent applications of the RMS approach. Please use these links to access the PRIME RMS2 report, a brief overview of the RMS, and additional resources from the Resilience Evaluation, Assessment and Learning (REAL) initiative, awarded by the USAID Center for Resilience.

Links: Please use these links to access the recently released PRIME RMS2 report, a brief overview of the RMS, and additional resources from the Resilience Evaluation, Assessment and Learning (REAL) initiative, awarded by the USAID Center for Resilience.

The discussion included:

  1. Key findings from the PRIME RMS-2: What was the severity of the drought, how did households cope, and what was the role of project interventions, humanitarian assistance, and households’ resilience capacities in their ability to recover?
  2. How USAID and the PRIME project are using the RMS findings.
  3. Other places and programs where RMS is being adapted and applied, including as a monitoring tool in Bangladesh and using remote cell-phone data collection in Somalia. The discussion will note key insights to enhance the RMS approach going forward. Please use these links to access the recently released PRIME RMS2 report, a brief overview of the RMS, and additional resources from the Resilience Evaluation, Assessment and Learning (REAL) initiative, awarded by the USAID Center for Resilience.

Speakers include:

Tim Frankenberger is the President and co-founder of TANGO International and has over 35 years of experience in international development activities. Tim has extensive experience in resilience measurement, project design, monitoring and evaluation, food and livelihood security assessments, vulnerability assessments, and policy analysis. He has actively contributed to the Resilience Measurement Technical Working Group and co-authored numerous papers developing resilience measurement standards. He has also published articles, evaluations, and reports focusing on resilience and household food and livelihood security and has worked in more than 30 countries. Tim has facilitated many workshops on resilience measurement, monitoring and evaluation, and project design, food security concepts, assessment approaches, livelihood approaches, and strategic planning.

Tiffany Griffin currently leads the resilience measurement, monitoring, evaluation, and analysis work for the Center for Resilience at USAID. Previously, she was Manager for Impact and Learning for the Democracy Fund, a private foundation in Washington DC, as well as a Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist at USAID supporting the Feed the Future initiative. In this latter role, Tiffany provided leadership on food security resilience measurement, particularly with respect to impact evaluation. She also provided technical leadership on all phases of the evaluation process, including project management, design, implementation, dissemination, and results translation. Using mixed-methods approaches and systems modeling, Tiffany has applied research techniques typically confined to the lab to complex real-world contexts. Prior to her food security work at USAID, Tiffany worked in the US Senate on domestic health policy, as well as on domestic food and nutrition policy. She received her doctorate in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan.

Karyn Fox’s recent work focuses on resilience programming and measurement, adaptive governance of social-ecological systems, climate change adaptation, and participatory research methodologies. She has worked with TANGO since 2001, as a researcher and manager of TANGO’s evaluation portfolio for WFP. Karyn also worked for the University of Arizona Master’s in Development Practice program, helping to design and teach in the program, with an emphasis on linking graduate students with applied development research and practice at TANGO International and other agencies worldwide. She holds an MS in International Agricultural Development from UC Davis and a PhD in Sociocultural and Ecological Anthropology from the University of Arizona.

A recording of the webinar is available here: